Friday, 14 June 2013

Bluebird Tea Co's Elderflower Champagne Tea

Regular readers of my blog will know that I have recently fallen head over heels  again with the ritual of tea making.  At a festival earlier this month I met with Krisi & Mike from Bluebird Tea Co who were exhibiting there.

I love Bluebird Tea Co's story and mantra.  After working for tea companies in the UK and Canada, they decided to set-up on their own and create a business that focuses on being tea mixologists and creating their own tea blends.  They called the company Bluebird to remind themselves every day of all the 'Bluebird Days' that they had in Canada and the feelings that they experienced out there. The attitude that on a perfect day (in the skiing world that is loads of powder snow and blue skies) everyone stops what they were going to do that day.  Work, school, businesses shut up, and they go and enjoy this once a year day as if it won't ever come around again.  Now isn't that a great approach to have?  To read their story in full, see here.

Continuing my resolve to make time for the delicious art form of tea making, at the festival, discussing the glory of all things tea with Bluebird, they suggested I try one of their signature teas called Elderflower Champagne.



Elderflower Champagne is a combination of floral/fruity ingredients  - elderflower, lemon verbena, apple pieces, orange peel, lemon peel, hibiscus and rosehip blended together with the tea leaves of Chinese oolong.

Elderflower Champagne leaves prior to brewing




Oolong is considered to be the very best, the champers, of the tea world, hence the tea name includes the reference to 'champagne'.   Oolong tea is a very special tea that sits between green and black on the tea scale (so it is partly fermented/oxidised).  There are many different types of Oolong, as with all teas, but in general it is well known for its appearance - tightly curled balls that when steeped, unfurl into beautiful full leaves. 

Elderflower Champagne leaves brewing



Elderflower Champagne came from Bluebird Tea Co's concept of creating an elegant blend that matched the nature of the Oolong with the delicate notes of elderflower and the depth of citrus. 


Elderflower Champagne tea once brewed



To make a cup of Elderflower Champagne, allow a teaspoon's worth of tea to brew in hot water for about 3 minutes, strain the leaves (but keep them to one side) and enjoy the tea without the additions of milk or sugar.  (For more tips on brewing, see Bluebird's link).  Now, I love sugar in my tea ordinarily, so it was a hard feat to keep away from the sugar bowl but when tasting the tea, it was pure, light, totally refreshing and the sugar wasn't missed at all.  You get the flavour hits of tea leaves with herbal-floral infusion within every sip.  

The beauty of this tea is that the leaves can be kept after use and can be re-brewed for up to 7 times, still retaining the flavour and making the tea even more value for money.

As well as the glorious taste and appearance of the tea, it contains more antioxidants and less caffeine than a regular cup of tea with its benefits contributing to good metabolism and circulation.

Aside from Elderflower Champagne, Bluebird Tea Co have a variety of teas ranging from the all familiar black tea, en vogue green tea, herbal teas, caffeine-free to the more specialised teas containing chocolate and even vegan tea.  Take a look around Bluebird Tea Co's online tea caddy which also includes sample packs and tea making tools to purchase!

As for me, I'm going to kick back and re-brew my Elderflower Champagne leaves.  After all, that's what tea-breaks are all about, taking time out and dreaming of that ideal Bluebird day.....



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Bluebird Tea Co are exhibiting at the BBC Good Food Show at the NEC Birmingham until 16th June 2013.

Disclosure:  This post was written following receipt of a sample from Bluebird Tea Co.  This review was conducted honestly without bias and I was not required to produce a positive review.  For further details of my PR policy, please see the Press, PR & Food Writing page of this website. 











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